Posts Tagged ‘Dance’


How to Include Dance in Your Lesson Plan

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017

Children dancing

Just as with most sports, dance has many benefits beyond the physical. It has been shown to improve a child’s social and emotional skills, with teachers reporting that dance made their students more accepting of one another and respectful of their body and that of others. Dance is also a good means of fitness for children who may shy away from team sports, where coaches and competition can be a bit much to handle for younger students.  

With these benefits in mind, dance could be the perfect activity to incorporate into your next lesson plan.

Selecting the Style

 

From conga lines to square dancing to Irish jigs, there are so many types of dance you can use to inspire your lesson plan. The dance that works best for you will consider a number of factors, including the size of activity space and the age of your students.

For kindergarten to grade two, the best style of dance is one composed of simple movements. The teacher makes a series of individual body movements, such as touching his nose, then swaying his hips, then jumping in the air. Children are asked to mimic those movements while maintaining their personal space, an excellent way to teach simple choreography, coordination, and balance. Most movement is on the spot, so modeling can be done in a regular classroom or gym.

For primary school children, dances such as tap and jazz will build the strength and flexibility of students’ legs and feet, as well as introduce them to different types of music. Once students get older and are able to better memorize routines, ballroom, Latin, and faster jigs are ways to challenge students. These dances will require a larger activity space, such as a gymnasium.

Whatever the age of your students, make sure all lessons include a proper warmup and cool down!

Consider the Learning Objectives

 

It could be that you want to incorporate dance into your lesson plan because of its myriad of health and wellness benefits. While this may be true, have you considered the other learning objectives dance can help achieve?

Increased Coordination and Rhythm

Partner dances that incorporate extra movement are effective in increasing coordination and rhythm. For early primary students, dances like the Hawaiian Roller Coaster Ride involve movements performed by individual children and performed with one another. Once the music is played, children are asked to time their claps and knuckle taps to the music, which will teach them to listen to the natural rhythm of a song.

Encouraging Creativity

Dance is an artistic expression of creativity. This is the case with any form of dance, but free-form interpretive is the best style to get students to move as they feel. While there are definitely nuances to contemporary interpretive dance, younger students can participate in this type of dance by simply moving along to a piece of music. Try an interpretive “free dance” session at the end of your class — let kids do what they want, and be amazed by the results!

Cultural Education

Almost every style of dance has its underpinnings in some historical and cultural context. For middle school and high school students, dance is an excellent way to complement history lessons, giving teens a less conventional look at the social and cultural side of a certain period.

For more inspiration and helpful instructional videos that will guide you every (dance) step of the way, pick up your SPARK dance DVD today!

Just Dance: Improving a Child’s Emotional and Social Skills Through Dance

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

Dance class

There’s a reason why it feels so good when you have an uninhibited dance party in your bedroom. As well as being a great way to release tension — not to mention have a lot of fun — there are studies showing that dance is also an excellent way to foster the emotional and social growth of children.

Dancing combines all the benefits of physical activity with those of educating children about music and the arts. From an emotional and social standpoint, dance classes for kids between the ages of kindergarten and grade 12 are proven to have an impact when it comes to acceptance of others, respect, teamwork, and cooperation.

This could be because dance gives children the opportunity to express themselves freely and creatively, which allows an outlet for emotional and physical release. While children are still developing full cognitive abilities, it could be that they choose to send messages through dance rather than having to articulate their thoughts in speech.

Dance creates a social environment where kids need to cooperate with and trust one another to complete the moves and avoid stepping on toes. At a very young age, it also instills a greater respect for one’s body, and the bodies of others. Socially, it teaches children how to hold one another appropriately, how to be aware of someone else’s movement, and how to understand the physical abilities and limits of one’s own body.

Dance teaches the aforementioned skills in a language children understand: movement. Kids learn by doing, and there’s nothing better than moving through a dance routine to synthesize the lessons learned.

Bringing Dance to Schools

A survey conducted in 2014-2015 showed that 66% of LA-based schools that incorporated dancing reported seeing its students become more accepting of one another. This acceptance is important, especially in schools with at-risk students or communities where children come from diverse racial backgrounds. Dance, like music, is a universal language, and one that is relevant to every culture around the world. As research collected by NDEO states, dance can help at-risk students deal with more complex emotional and social conflicts, such as violence and race. By creating dance exercises that mirror the movements of different students, the head dancer is able to feel like a leader, and understands that they’re being accepted and respected by their peers.

As a bonus, participation in the arts is also shown to have a positive academic influence on children. A study on this topic found that students who took part in the arts performed better on standardized tests, had higher SAT and math scores, and were more focused in class. Dance can also have much needed health benefits at a time when 18% of American children aged 6 to 11 are obese and only 1 in 3 children are physically active on a daily basis.

If you’re wondering where to get started with bringing dance to your school, look no further than the SPARKdance DVD. Ideal for K-12 students, the DVD includes more than 20 dances and lesson guides so the benefits of the activity are within every educator’s grasp. There is also a Dance Decoded workshop for teachers who want to take their school’s physical education program to the next level.

16 Ideas for Teaching Dance in PE

Thursday, November 12th, 2015

Keeping students interested in physical education can be a difficult task. This is especially true in the case of larger classes, limited equipment, and a wide range of student abilities. To combat all of these issues, some PE instructors have started incorporating dance into their lessons. By using dance as a teaching tool, these instructors are able to use creativity, involve more students, teach life skills,  and use resources wisely, all while allowing students to become fully involved in the teaching process. Also, keep in mind that Dance & Rhythms is in the National Standards and should be considered when teaching physical education.

teaching dance

Why Teach Dance in PE?

  • Many students can feel left out or inadequate in traditional PE activities such as team sports. Often, these activities focus on the students who are already good at sports, which discourage others. Dance can offer a break from these activities and allow these students to shine.

  • “Dance” is an incredibly wide area of study. This means you can appeal to a number of backgrounds through dances from the hula to line dancing.

  • Teaching dance teaches students skills they can use at events outside of the classroom, such as social events. Additionally, exposure to rhythm helps children understand other concepts, such as music.

  • Instructors can adapt dance lessons for any ability or age group. This allows for a wider range of students to feel as if they can succeed in the activity, which encourages enthusiasm.

  • Students can bring in their own music, which also allows for more involvement.

  • Teaching dance uses little equipment—generally, all an instructor needs is a large space, something to play music, and maybe a screen to show moves more easily. This helps with keeping costs low.

  • Forming dance steps can easily incorporate other fitness ideas, such as calisthenics, in a fun way.

How to Use Dance in PE

  • As stated above, using student input to choose songs allows for more involvement.  Using different kinds of songs can get students with all kinds of backgrounds more engaged.

  • Make sure that there are large spaces and enough room for everyone to move around.

  • Consider using steps that can be modified to fit abilities. This will help more students feel as if they can participate and do well.

  • On a similar note, remember that the main goal of this is to keep students moving. This means that it’s better to encourage students to do their best rather than emphasizing doing the steps perfectly.

  • The jigsaw method can empower students to feel as if they are capable. In this strategy, the instructor organizes students into small groups and assigns each group to learn a step of the dance. When the groups have learned that step, they teach it to the rest of the class.

  • Starting with small steps helps make the process seem less daunting and easier to learn.

  • Websites such as YouTube and Vimeo have many examples of dances and ideas that other instructors can adapt or build off for their students.

  • If you have a space with a stage or a screen, you can use it to your advantage. Showing steps on a stage elevates you, so more students can see you. Additionally, using a screen allows for video use.

  • Make sure to encourage students that all sorts of people dance, regardless of gender or other interests.

Teaching dance in physical education classes can benefit both teachers and students. Dance allows instructors to be creative and engage students who might not get as much out of other activities. Students also benefit from being more involved in the planning process and having flexible goals that allow them to feel achievement in these lessons.

Have you ever used dance in your classroom? What are some of the ideas you used to keep students engaged in the process?