Archive for the ‘Physical Education News’ Category


SPARK Holiday Gift to YOU: 20% PE Equipment Discount!

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014

Use Promo code 081GOE to receive a 20% discount on SPARK PE equipment from December 1st – December 31st, 2014. Click Here to start shopping!

Promo Details:

Must order online through SPARKstore (Click Here for the SPARKstore)
Valid: 12/1/14 – 12/31/14
EP 20% discount off 9/8 items
LP 40% discount off 9/8 items

Cannot be combined with any other discounts, does NOT apply to sale priced items.
Available in continental U.S. only. Online orders only.

Standard freight policy will apply.

Questions? Contact us at 1-800-SPARK PE or spark@sparkpe.org

Quality Physical Education – Defined by the New SHAPE America Standards

Friday, November 21st, 2014

We are all familiar with SHAPE America goal for physical education, “To develop physically literate individuals who have the knowledge, skills and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity.”   But are you aware of the new standards adopted in May?  Our new national standards now include grade level outcomes!  These standards and grade level outcomes are critical in our profession to support teachers everywhere as they strive for accountability.  We physical educators should be held to the same accountability levels as other core subject teachers, and our students should have specific and clearly defined outcomes to strive towards.

The grade-level outcomes are benchmarks that identify what students should know and be able to do by the end of each grade.  They serve as a guide for physical educators to use to track students’ progress toward becoming physically literate individuals, which is the overarching goal of the five new National Standards.  These can also be used to show student growth and teacher quality, both important factors in today’s teaching world.  You can purchase the grade – level outcomes through SHAPE America.

In case you have not seen the new National Standards for Physical Education, here they are!

Standard 1
The physically literate individual demonstrates competency in a variety of motor skills and movement patterns.

Standard 2
The physically literate individual applies knowledge of concepts, principles, strategies and tactics related to movement and performance.

Standard 3
The physically literate individual demonstrates the knowledge and skills to achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical activity and fitness.

Standard 4
The physically literate individual exhibits responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others.

Standard 5
The physically literate individual recognizes the value of physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression and/or social interaction.

SPARK supports and aligns their content and instruction to SHAPE standards and outcomes.  Their research-based programs assist physical educators in implementing a quality physical education program aligned to national and/or state standards.  You can view their SPARK State Standards Alignment page.

SPARK has also updated their lesson plans on SPARKfamily.org for those of you who subscribe.

Thousands of schools and districts have chosen SPARK as their preferred physical education program due to the many resources available to help teachers maximize student outcomes.  Visit their website to learn more – and — take advantage of their free resources!  www.sparkpe.org

SPARK Teams Up with ICAN Foundation

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

SPARK Teams Up with ICAN Foundation to Rush Past Childhood Obesity with New Orleans Saints Running Back Pierre Thomas

Partnership aims to decrease “screen-time” and increase physical activity both during school and after school with quality PE programming and community events

SPARK™, provider of the world’s most-researched physical education programs, is partnering with ICAN Foundation to make an immediate impact on the lives of students in Illinois, Louisiana and Mississippi. SPARK and ICAN Foundation will work together to help schools and community centers raise funds or apply for and win grants in order to implement SPARK’s high-quality physical education curricula or afterschool program.

SHAPE America recommends that school-aged children receive at least 60-minutes of physical activity per day. This is hard to achieve if students spend most of the eight-hour school day sitting behind desks. SPARK fights this sedentary school model by making classroom instruction, PE classes and after school programs more physically active. Similarly, the increased amount of time youth spend using electronics is impeding on physical activity after school and on the weekends. Through its community programs and initiatives, ICAN Foundation is helping create more active lifestyles to demonstrate how being active can be fun and rewarding.

“After learning about the similarities of our organizations and the fact that SPARK is the number-one research-based health organization in our country, I knew a partnership was necessary,” said Pierre Thomas, New Orleans Saints running back and founder of ICAN Foundation. “This will be a great opportunity for everyone involved, especially the students.”

“Working with ICAN Foundation is the perfect marriage of ideas for SPARK,” said Paul Rosengard, executive director of SPARK. “With the foundation’s deep community connections in Illinois, Louisiana and Mississippi, and SPARK’s 25 years of experience in schools nationwide, we make a great team. With a joint goal of increasing the amount of physical activity youth receive every day, we know that together we can make an impact on those communities.”

How Can You Help?
Together, ICAN and SPARK will implement research-based programing to help combat childhood obesity in Illinois, Louisiana and Mississippi. Your support, partnership, or donation can assist us in our efforts. Please contact us to learn more and support the effort to combat childhood obesity.

Dr. Kymm Ballard
SPARK Partnership Development Manager
(336) 263-3646
kymm.ballard@sparkpe.org

Vincent Calabrese
ICAN Foundation
(312) 285-9384
calabresevm@gmail.com

About ICAN Foundation
ICAN Foundation was founded by Pierre Thomas, New Orleans Saints running back, in response to the ongoing problem with childhood obesity. ICAN Foundation was established to prevent and educate the children and their parents about the seriousness of childhood obesity in the United States. www.believeican.org

About SPARK
SPARK is a collection of research-based Physical Education, After School, Early Childhood, and Coordinated School Health programs for educators serving Pre-K through 12th grade students. Since 1989, SPARK has provided curriculum materials, teacher training, and consultation to over 100,000 teachers and youth leaders, representing many thousands of schools, organizations, and agencies worldwide. SPARK also helps educators find physical education grants. For more information on SPARK, visit www.sparkpe.org or email spark@sparkpe.org or call 1-800-SPARK-PE.

ICAN Foundation-1

Childhood Obesity Crisis: An Update

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

Childhood Obesity Crisis: An Update

The Continuing High Cost of Doing Nothing

By Dr. Stan Bassin

Obesity is a modern health problem that impacts the modern world. Globally, more than 1 billion adults and 17.6 million children are estimated to be overweight (World Health Organization, 2009) and increasing. The proportional distribution of overweight around the world tends to vary with the developmental state of different countries. In developing nations, characterized by low standards of living and high population growth, underweight seems to be more prevalent than overweight. As countries modernize and begin to shift toward improved socioeconomic conditions, the wealthier portion of the population experiences an increase in the prevalence of high body mass index (BMI, the measure generally used as the indicator for obesity), while the poorer remain thin or underweight as a result of differing amounts of energy usage for tasks like transportation, and different levels of food accessibility and quality.

Further economic development results in another BMI shift, with the wealthy population receiving better nutrition and education which decreases BMI levels of the wealthy, as compared to members of the lower classes who experience an increased prevalence of high BMI (World Health Organization, 2009). The World Health Organization cites various obesity-associated health problems, many of which can be treated with an increase in physical activity. These include high blood pressure, stroke and other cardiovascular problems; insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism; sleep apnea, which can lead to neurocognitive defects (Dietz, 1998); and orthopedic ailments (World Health Organization, 2004). Other consequences include menstrual irregularities, as well as mental and emotional health problems. Overweight youth may have an elevated risk of developing asthma (Strong et al, 2005), and obesity is often associated with a reduction in deep breathing, narrowing of airways, shortness of breath and increased wheezing (Lucas, 2005).

The Cost of obesity related diseases is listed below in the Major United States Cities.

Childhood Obesity Crisis: An Update

Source: Gallup

Unfortunately according to Ladabaum, in the latest Study from Stanford School of Medicine 2014, we are not over eating but we are under exercising.

So, what can we do about this crisis?

There is not one simple way to solve the childhood obesity crisis, and many solutions are needed.  One solution is to get kids moving in school, since children spend a significant amount of time in the school setting (see Childhood Obesity: Quality Physical Education as a Solution video to learn more).  Evidence-based physical education programs like SPARK can help increase youth physical activity during the school day.  In addition, quality before/after school programs, integrated classroom physical activity breaks, and recess can provide additional opportunities for physical activity in school.

SPARK has continuously demonstrated it can elevate the rate of youth physical activity through its evidence-based and field-tested materials and training programs.  To learn more about evidence-based, quality physical education as a solution to the childhood obesity crisis, click here.  And, do your part by advocating for quality physical education and physical activity programs in your school.

Dr. Stanley Bassin

University of California, Irvine

Clinical Professor

Preventive Cardiology

SPARK celebrates 25! Reflection from Dr. Jim Sallis

Monday, July 21st, 2014

SPARK celebrates 25!

By Jim Sallis

It’s exhilarating to celebrate the 25th year of SPARK. In 1989 we had big ambitions for our new NIH grant. We wanted to define what health-related physical education is, comprehensively evaluate a program that we designed to meet that vision, and then encourage schools to adopt the program so kids could be healthier. I could not have imagined where those ideas have led by 2014. I am very proud to be part of the SPARK story, because SPARK has improved the physical activity, health, and quality of life for millions children and adolescents over the past 25 years.

The research teams worked hard on the SPARK and M-SPAN studies that produced the original curricula, training, and support model and materials. But there are numerous successful research programs that never have any impact in people’s lives. What makes SPARK different is the staff, led by Paul Rosengard. Paul and the staff not only share the vision of improving children’s health through physical activity, but they have built an organization that brings the joy of SPARK to about 1.5 million young people every day. I use “joy” of SPARK deliberately, because the first data we collected in a pilot study were enjoyment ratings of SPARK PE classes. We were pleased that the fifth graders chose “smiley faces” almost all the time for all the class activities. Delivering fun has been our job at SPARK ever since.

At 25, SPARK as an organization is now an adult. The staff have high level skills and are dedicated to doing a great job at customer service. We have created a national network of trainers, and the feedback from staff development sessions continues to be consistently enthusiastic. We take responsibility for updating, expanding, and improving programs and products. Like most young adults, SPARK is a sophisticated user of technology. Our video group has produced hundreds of videos that help instructors deliver great physical activity programs. All materials are now available online. I am amazed that teachers now can take all of SPARK out on the field with iPads. That is a real revolution in physical education. SPARK is even doing some traveling, growing rapidly in India and China. I’m confident SPARK will continue to evolve and innovate so we can get better at delivering great instruction to teachers and great physical activity to students.

As long as our schools want children to be active and healthier, we will keep delivering the joy of SPARK.

Jim Sallis

http://sallis.ucsd.edu

James F. Sallis, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor of Family and Preventive Medicine Chief,

Division of Behavioral Medicine. http://behavioralmedicine.ucsd.edu/

University of California, San Diego

SPARK Staff at ATM Dinner

SPARK staff celebrates 25 years at the Annual Trainers Meeting in June 2014

8 Healthy Summer Snacks for Kids

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

Even when kids are out of school for the summer, families are still on the go. Planning healthy snacks is a smart way to keep everyone healthy, energized, and well rounded for summer activities. Take a look at this short list of smart and healthy summer snacks for kids:

Watermelon. This super fruit lives up to its name—it’s made up of 92% water. It is also jam-packed with beta carotene, vitamin C, and lycopene. Plus, kids love it!

Homemade trail mix. Avoid buying the pre-packaged kind that can come laden with extra salt and sugar. Opt for your own recipe that includes nuts, dried fruits and even some coconut.

Peaches. Not only are these sweet, juicy fruits in season, but they keep your potassium levels healthy. Try throwing a few peaches in your beach bag for a quick, refreshing treat that will also keep your kids hydrated.

Cucumbers. These cool vegetables are good at keeping kids cool too. Cucumbers are an excellent hydration source and the skin contains plenty of vitamin C. They may even prove helpful in treating sunburn. The skin of a cucumber contains caffeic acid, a skin-soothing agent.

Grapes. These fruits are perfect for growing bodies because they promote healthy bone development and have even been linked to improved dental health. Whether green, red, or purple, grapes are sweet, easy to pack, and a summer favorite for kids. For an even more refreshing take, freeze them first.

Blueberries. Summer is an excellent season for berries of all kinds, including this super antioxidant. Aside from its cancer-prevention properties, blueberries are known to boost immunity because of their high levels of vitamin C, zinc, iron, and selenium. Try organic wild blueberries for added antioxidant benefits.

Homemade popsicles. There are countless ways to make popsicles at home, as long as you have a blender and popsicle molds. Even the popsicles in the grocery store that claim to be made from “real fruit” usually have additives and preservatives, so skip those and opt for a healthier, homemade version instead. Besides, your kids will love helping you make them.

Kiwi fruit. This tangy fruit is a kid favorite and usually pretty easy to find in the summer months. One piece of kiwi fruit actually contains higher levels of vitamin C than an orange, and just as much potassium as a banana. For kids with respiratory issues, kiwi fruit has been shown to improve shortness of breath and chronic cough.

What healthy snacks do you always have ready for your family to eat in the summer?

Happy 25th Anniversary to SPARK!

Monday, May 19th, 2014

How can SPARK be 25 when I’m only 39??

But it’s true!  In June, 1989 a couple of “relatively young” Professors from San Diego State University, Drs. Jim Sallis and Thom McKenzie, received a large award from NIH (National Institutes of Health) to create, implement, and evaluate an elementary school physical education program that could maximize health and behavior related outcomes, and eventually (if successful) become a nationwide model.  Project SPARK (Sports, Play, and Active Recreation for Kids) was born 25 years ago.

As they say, the rest is history.  Today, after many more research and special projects from Early Childhood through University levels, SPARK is referred to as, “The most researched and field-tested physical education program in the world.”

While the data tells an impressive story about significant student outcomes in physical activity, fitness, motor/sport skills, academic achievement, enjoyment of PE, activity levels away from school, program sustainability and more, there are a few lesser known stories from the early years of SPARK.

Did you know?

  • Jim Sallis thought of the name SPARK and the acronym
  • The first SPARK logo was orange and black (scary!) and the colors were voted on by kids in the study
  • One of the original consultants on the first SPARK study was Dr. Bob Pangrazi.  And Bob came back and spent a couple weeks in San Diego with us during our M-SPAN (Middle School Physical Activity and Nutrition – funded by NIH) project that ran from 1996-2000.
  • Kecia Carrasco was Jim and Thom’s first hire, and Kecia is still with SPARK today, 25 years later!
  • BJ Williston worked on the pilot study from 1989-1990 and after a hiatus to work on other studies/projects, she came back to SPARK again about 10 years ago and is now a Lead Trainer.
  • I met my wife Wendy in 1990 when the intervention began and we were married in 1991.  She was one of the elementary classroom teachers at a school we were working with.
  • SPARK won the Governor’s Commendation Award from California Governor Pete Wilson in September 1993
  • The SPARK dissemination effort began in 1994 (20 years ago) and Poway Unified School District was the first to purchase SPARK
  • SPARK’s Director of Dissemination, Leticia Gonzalez, joined SPARK as a part-time employee after her freshman year at San Diego State and has never left!
  • We used to have two cartoon characters in the pages of our manuals – SPARKle and SPARKy!  They were pretty cute, some of us were sad when they grew up…
  • SPARK’s first “beyond the 50 U.S. states experience” was Saipan in 1995.  I led workshops for the elementary physical education teachers on the island and it was a great experience.  Ironically, we’re sending trainers back there again this month.
  • Jim pronounced me – decreed actually — Godfather of SPARK in 1995.  I have a plaque to prove it!  So, if you want a favor, you’ll need some cannoli…

Over more than two decades, all of us at SPARK have appreciated the opportunity to provide innovative instructional materials, effective teacher training, excellent follow up support, and content-matched equipment to thousands of physical educators and physical activity leaders across the globe.

Thank YOU.

Cheers to another 25 years!

Paul RosengardSpark yellow logo color

1993 Governors Award

SPARK’s Common Core Survival Guide (Part 2)

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

SPARK’s Common Core Survival Guide (Part 2)

Lesson planning to meet CCSS mandates with a focus on PE

By Aaron Hart (@nyaaronhart on Twitter)

Welcome to the second installment of our CCSS Survival Guide. As I mentioned in Part 1, it’s important to know and understand your district’s interpretation and guidelines for working toward Common Core Standards.

This week’s tip: Planning with Depth of Knowledge (DOK) on your mind.

If you would like a quick refresh on DOK you can visit Part 1 of this series.

Consistent with other CCSS concepts, lesson-planning structure is also nothing new. I’m sure most of you will recognize the lesson components I’m outlining as we review them. What I believe is important here is that we define each component in light of CCSS and speak the language of the standards, as well as other core subjects (remember PE is – or at least should be – a core subject).

As a resource, SPARK is providing a Standards-based Lesson Planner here to help you with your alignment.

Component 1: Standards Focus

There are two fields provided for this component of the planner, one for PE standards and one for Academic Standards. (We don’t label this section CCSS because each state is different and it is possible that one day CCSS will be a thing of the past.) This allows you to clearly define the standards that you’re working toward during your lesson. The space for PE standards is above and is larger than the academic standards because we’re PE teachers and as PE teachers, our focus should remain on OUR standards.

Component 2: Academic Language Focus

This field allows you enter key physical education vocabulary words that are the focus of the day’s lesson. These are the words that you’ll use, define, and model in order to increase your students’ depth of knowledge.

Component 3: Student Targets

AKA – objectives. This field provides four lines, enough room for 2 to 4 student learning targets. These statements should reflect DOK outcomes for the lesson and should also link directly back to the standards listed above. These targets will also provide structure and meaning to the assessment tools that you’ll select below. Well written targets are observable, measurable and developmentally appropriate.

Component 4: Assessment Tool Used

The main point of DOK is to provide a structure for preparing students to demonstrate their skill and understanding on a given assessment. So, this field is important. However, it’s also important to keep in mind that assessments do not need to result in an every-day grade, or be put on display for all to critique. Visual performance demonstrations, as well as group and individual discussion are appropriate Formative Assessments. This field allows you to clearly define the assessment opportunities that you’ll use to either guide or evaluate student DOK.

Component 5: Frontload the lesson with a “Hook”

Back in the old days we used to call this “Anticipatory Set.” This component provides a brief discussion topic or point that you’ll use in order to get the students curious about the day’s lesson. It’s where you’ll “hook” them in with something interesting and on topic. This can be done just before, during, or after your lesson ASAP.

Component 6: Selected Physical Activities (In Sequence)

Our planner provides space for three scaffolded activities. Depending on your lesson duration, you may need more or less than 3. If you need more and want to use our planner, simply fill out an additional PDF form for activities 4, 5, and so on.

The fields in this section provide room for the activity title, as well as a field for transition notes. The idea is that you’ll have your activity plans in addition to this planner on your iPad or clipboard. What’s important here is that selected activities build on one another, increasing the depth of knowledge presented and practiced.

Component 7: Debrief / Think About

This part of the lesson is one of the most important and is also one of the most often forgotten. In an effort to maximize activity time and teach proper fitness habits, I suggest that you have your students sit and stretch during the debrief. You can even model good stretching technique with your younger students while you discuss the day’s lesson.

The key to effective DOK debrief sessions is using DOK question stems. Again, this type of questioning and discussion is nothing new. However the DOK stems do provide a great starting point for planning a meaningful end to your lesson.

Again, here’s a link to SPARK’s Standards-based Lesson Planner.

Our CCSS alignment is an ongoing work in progress so please send us your feedback and questions. We’re all learning this together!

SPARK’s Paul Rosengard Receives Honor Award

Monday, April 7th, 2014

At this year’s annual CAHPERD (California Association of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance) SPARK researcher, co-author and Executive Director Paul Rosengard was presented with the CAHPERD Honor Award for his “Outstanding and noteworthy contributions to the advancement of physical education in California.”

“It was special to receive the award in front of a lot of friends and colleagues” Rosengard said.  “I thanked two my mentors Jim Sallis and Thom McKenzie, as well as everyone on our SPARK team.  I felt very humbled and grateful to the CAHPERD board for supporting my nomination.”

A few years ago, Rosengard received a “Past President’s Award” from CAHPERD when he was singled out by Dr. Robin Reese of Sacramento State University.

“Robin was a brilliant writer and teacher and helped many of us think differently about physical education content and instruction.  You might say she went against the grain — a quality I admire greatly – so I was particularly happy to be acknowledged by her.”

This June, SPARK will celebrate 25 years of research (N.I.H. funded in 1989) and 20 years of dissemination.  Read more about SPARK at www.sparkpe.org

Paul CAHPERD Award

Recess Implementation Ideas & Resources

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014

Part 2 of 2

BRecess Implementation Ideas & Resources y BJ Williston

SPARK K-12 Trainer & Curriculum Developer

Click Here to read Part 1 of this article.

After assessing your current recess program with the School Recess Report Card in the SPARK Recess Handbook (included in the SPARKabc’s program), prioritize the components targeted for improvement.  Priority goes to the components with the lowest scores on the report card.

It is then time to implement!

The SPARK Recess Program includes all sorts of components to improve your school’s recess.

Activity Areas

Divide your recess environment into 4 main activity areas:

  1. Playground Structure for unstructured free-play
  2. Group Games Area
  3. Individual and Partner Games/Activities Area
  4. A perimeter area for students to walk/jog around

There should also be space and resources for those students who aren’t able to participate due to illness/injury/etc.

Supervision

It is suggested that adults be the Recess Supervisors responsible for the overall procedures, set-up, and safety.   Student Game Leaders work with the Supervisors to distribute and collect equipment, set up activity areas, and serve as a liaison to communicate student concerns.  Once the program is up and running, students arrive at recess, choose from a variety of activities and follow recess expectations.

Both Supervisors and Game Leaders promote Character Matters, a social skills development program designed to identify, reinforce, and assess character education concepts in physical activity settings like PE and recess.  Concepts such as cooperation, respect, concern, leadership, and fair play are introduced at the beginning of the school year in all SPARK PE programs (K-12) and SPARK After School.

Activities

SPARK’s Recess Program offers a variety of activities for students to choose from. Individual/Partner activities include 2 and 4-Square, Hoop Stations, Jump Rope Stations, and Flying Disc Golf. Group games include 3-Catch and All-Run Kickball.

Maintenance

Recess Supervisors keep the program going by completing monthly Recess Action Plans, maintaining equipment, encouraging enthusiasm among the Student Game Leaders, and staying on top of the needs of the program.  Details for this maintenance are laid out in the Recess Handbook.

SPARKabc’s Recess Program can help your school get it all together to achieve all the benefits a fabulous recess program can bring!

Advocate for Recess

Want to advocate for better recess policies at your school? Take these 5 steps:

  1. Refine your own viewpoint about how children learn best.
  2. Spread the word: share proof about the significance of recess (see attachment for citations).
  3. Lobby for safe and properly maintained play areas in your school, neighborhood, and community.
  4. Get connected to local organizations that support recess.
  5. Stay informed with action alerts from local and national organizations such as the National Association for the Education of Young Children.

For more information on the SPARKabc’s Program and the SPARK Recess Program, go to www.sparkpe.org/abc or contact SPARK at 1-800-SPARK PE (772-7573).